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Adaptive Cruise Control Flushing NY

Traditional cruise control"first offered in the United States on 1958 Chrysler models"certainly comes in handy on long drives. But cruise control has one drawback: it relies on the driver to judge the "closing" distance between their vehicle and the one in front.

AutoZone
(718) 961-6102
155-05 Northern Blvd
Flushing, NY
 
AutoZone
(718) 565-7107
9501 Northern Blvd
Flushing, NY
 
AutoZone
(718) 523-0320
109-02 Merrick Blvd
Jamaica, NY
 
AutoZone
(718) 529-8880
135-15 Rockaway Blvd
S Ozone Park, NY
 
Maaco Auto Body Shop and Collision Center
(718) 776-2000
212-50 Jamaica Ave.
Queens Village, NY
Hours
Mon-Fri :8AM - 6PM
Sat:8AM - 2PM
Sun:Closed

AutoZone
(718) 380-8648
160-20 Union Turnpike
Fresh Meadows, NY
 
AutoZone
(718) 846-8546
112-20 Atlantic Ave
Jamaica, NY
 
AutoZone
(718) 742-0255
541 East 149 St
Bronx, NY
 
Maaco Auto Body Shop and Collision Center
(718) 786-0966
31-02 Northern Blvd.
Long Island City, NY
Hours
Mon-Fri :8AM - 5:30PM
Sat:9AM - 12PM
Sun:Closed

AutoZone
(718) 388-2064
535 Morgan Ave
Brooklyn, NY
 

Adaptive Cruise Control

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Traditional cruise control"first offered in the United States on 1958 Chrysler models"certainly comes in handy on long drives. But cruise control has one drawback: it relies on the driver to judge the "closing" distance between their vehicle and the one in front. As automotive technology continues to evolve, traditional cruise control is gradually being replaced by adaptive cruise control (ACC).

What is adaptive cruise control?

Adaptive cruise control"a more technologically advanced version of the traditional cruise control system"allows drivers to maintain a pre-set speed while the system automatically monitors the traffic patterns and adjusts the "closing" distance by using the throttle and the brakes to maintain a pre-set distance behind the vehicle ahead. Unlike traditional cruise control systems that are only linked to the throttle for limited acceleration capabilities, adaptive cruise control "reads" traffic conditions and modulates the throttle and the brakes to keep the vehicle a safe distance from the vehicle in front of it. The earliest versions of adaptive cruise control were designed exclusively for driving at higher speeds and did not work at speeds below 20 miles per hour or in stop-and-go situations.

How does ACC work?
When the driver activates the ACC system, a microwave radar unit, a light-based unit (called lidar, which is located on the front of the vehicle), or cameras mounted on the front of the vehicle begin to scan for other vehicles or objects within a distance of nearly 500 feet in front of the vehicle. When the system senses a vehicle or object, it calculates the distance and relative speed and the onboard computer then automatically sends a message to apply the brakes to maintain a pre-programmed distance behind it. When the traffic has cleared or the object has moved, the system will accelerate the vehicle back to the previously set speed. Like traditional cruise control, an adaptive cruise control system is cancelled when the driver applies the brakes....

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