Choosing A Temp Agency Long Island City NY

Temps don't actually work for you, but are employees of the agency. The agency takes out their taxes, manages their time cards and provides them with certain benefits. All you need to do is occasionally sign a time card.

Access Staffing
(212) 687-5440
360 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Office Support, Light Industrial, Legal, Insurance, Information Technology, Human Resources, Healthcare & Human Services , Fashion & Retail , Event Planning, Creative, Bilingual Japanese , Audit, Advertising, Accounting & Financial,

Taylor Hodson Inc.
(212) 924-8300
133 West 19th Street
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Public Relations
Private Equity
Non-Profit
Media/Communications
Marketing
Hedge Funds
Financial Services
Fashion
Executive Search
Consulting
Banking
Advertising


Wall Street Services
(212) 509-7200
11 Broadway
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
MBA Financial Consultants
Compliance
Financial Engineering
Entry-level Finance
Trading Floor
Wealth Management
Private Equity
Operations / Trade Processing
Accounting Professionals
Investment Banking

Type of Service
Mon 7:30am-5:30pm
Tue 7:30am-5:30pm
Wed 7:30am-5:30pm
Thu 7:30am-5:30pm
Fri 7:30am-5:30pm
Sat Closed
Sun Closed

The Tuttle Agency
(212) 497-9500
295 Madison Avenue at 41st Street
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
human resources
specialty staffing
sales/marketing/advertising
creative
technology/analytics
hospitality
healthcare
legal
financial
administrative
accounting


Millennium Personnel Corp.
(212) 244-2777
224 West 30th Street
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Sales/Marketing Assistant, Executive Assistant, Office Assistant, Administrative Assistant, Receptionist
Type of Service
Walk-in Interviews, 9am-12pm
Mon-Thurs, no appointments needed.

New York Staffing Services, Inc.
(212) 425-2979
40 Exchange Place
New York, NY
 
Kelly Services
212-949-5313 
237 PARK AVE
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Accounting, Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Audit, Banking, Billing, Bookkeeping, Budget, Collections, Credit, Finance, Forensic Accounting, GAAP/IFRS, Insurance, Internal Audit, Mortgage, Payroll, Public Accounting, SEC Reporting, SOX, Tax, Treasury, Trust Operation

Michael Page International
+1 212 661 4800
405 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Tax, Supply Chain, Sales, Procurement, Marketing, Manufacturing, Legal, Human Resources, Financial Services, Finance, Engineering, Banking, Accounting

Adam Personnel
(212) 557-9150
11 East 44th St.
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Accounting, Consulting, Administrative, Banking and Financial Services , Fashion, Financial Software, Human Resources , Import/Export, Information Technology, Nonprofit, Public Relations , Real Estate , Sports Entertainment , Temporary

Active Staffing
(212) 244-6444
41 West 33rd Street
New York, NY
Main Industries / Positions
Industrial, Production, Warehouse, Retail, Clerical, Food Service

Choosing A Temp Agency

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Deserving or not, the temporary work force is sometimes the unfortunate butt of corporate jokes. For whatever reason, they seem to generate more around-the-water-cooler "what's up with that guy?" commentary than last night's Seinfeld repeat. But in reality, they make up a large percentage of the work force, often the unsung heroes of last minute project fixes, understaffed departments and flu-battered offices.

So where do you find these saviors? Find a good Temporary Agency.

How Temp Agencies Work
Temps don't actually work for you, but are employees of the agency. The agency takes out their taxes, manages their time cards and provides them with certain benefits. All you need to do is occasionally sign a time card.

Most agencies make their money by marking up the workers' wages by a certain percentage and charging it to their clients (that's you). Agencies usually charge between 15% and 25% over the worker's rate. So if the employee gets $14 an hour, you will pay the agency about $18 an hour.

Finding The Right Temp Agency
Consulting the yellow pages and doing an Internet search will give you a solid list of agencies to choose from. To find the right one, do your homework.

Go For Specialty. A lot of agencies focus on a specific line of work, such as temporary paralegals or the entertainment industry. If you see an agency that caters to your business, try them first.

Request a Client List. Find out what types of companies are using the agency and for how long. If possible, talk to their clients' HR departments to find out how the agency has worked for them. Find out how they are at processing requests, if they can respond to a last-minute emergency, and if their temps represent the agency well.
Compare Rates. Ask for the average hourly wage temporary employees receive, and what their markup percentage rate is, then compare with other agencies on your list.

Find Out if Employees are Insured. If anything were to happen to a temporary employee on your company's time or premises, you want to make sure they are protected and you won't be liable.
Get References. Request recommendations or client testimonials.

Interview the Agency. Ask:

  • How many temporary employees do you have?

  • How do you decide if an employee is qualified to work at your agency?

  • Do you train employees?

  • What tasks and technologies are they trained on? (i.e., spreadsheets, typing)

  • How fast can you get an employee to my office?

  • How often do temporary employees become permanent with clients?

    These are basic answers that you may need to know, so get the information you need.

    Throw Them a Scenario. Along with the basic questions, make the agencies earn your trust. Think about a situation that might really arise in your company, and find out what they can do for you:

    "It's 9:30. I need four temps by 11:00, and all of them need to speak Cantonese and know sign language. Can you handle it?"

    Ok, slightly overboard. But the key is not what they answer (if they are any bit of a representative, they'll say "yes"), but how. If an agency representative says, "Um, sure?", while another says, "We have 20 temps who are bilingual and type at least 60 words a minute," then you know which horse to bet on.

    Test Them Out. Try and get a trial run with the agency. Have an agency give you a few weeks with their service and see if the situation runs smoothly. If you feel comfortable with them, then you have a match. If the agency gives you too many headaches, try another. Like any service, feel free to shop around for the one that best suits you.

    Visit How-to.com for more information