Fibromyalgia Treatment Binghamton NY

Treating fibromyalgia requires a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. Among the most effective treatments are medications, exercise, sleep management, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Benjamin M Bartolotto
(607) 723-5491
381 Conklin Ave. 
Binghamton, NY
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Abram H Nichols
(607) 797-2538
104 Grand Blvd. 
Binghamton, NY
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Paul R Laman
(607) 797-6287
327 Burbank Ave. 
Johnson City, NY
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Douglas J Taber
(607) 754-4850
200 Front St. 
Vestal, NY
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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HealthSource of Great Bend
(570) 879-2979
325 Main St
Great Bend, PA

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Mark V Shumeyko, MD
(607) 772-0639
40 Mitchell Ave
Binghamton, NY
Business
UMA Gastroenterology
Specialties
Gastroenterology

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John W Miller, MD
(607) 729-7666
169 Riverside Dr
Binghamton, NY
Business
Broome Urological Associates LLP
Specialties
Urology

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Southern Tier Veterinary Associates
(607) 754-7164
205 Front St
Vestal, NY

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Lori E Ferrara
(607) 748-4448
333 Odell Ave. 
Endicott, NY
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Lynn Bayly
(717) 879-2979
401 Main St. 
Great Bend, PA
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Fibromyalgia Treatment

Group of Women

Treating fibromyalgia requires a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. Among the most effective treatments are medications, exercise, sleep management, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Treatment centers on managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; there is no cure. Since symptoms vary, so does treatment.

Exercise

Exercise may seem an impossibly tall order—after all, if you're in pain, how can you work out? But if you don't get regular aerobic exercise, your muscles become weaker, making them even more susceptible to pain during everyday tasks. In fact, studies find that aerobic exercise such as swimming and walking improves muscle fitness and reduces muscle pain and tenderness in people with fibromyalgia. Stick with a low-impact exercise program, however, such as swimming or water aerobics, and check with your health care professional if you've been sedentary.

Exercise can also help you sleep better, improve your mood, reduce pain, increase flexibility, improve blood flow, help you maintain your weight and promote general physical fitness. It is inexpensive and, if done correctly, has few negative side effects. Just be sure to discuss any new exercise program with a health care professional if you've been inactive.

When you exercise, listen to your body and know when to stop or slow down to prevent pain caused by over-exercising. Also talk to your health care professional about whether you should exercise if you're already in pain.

Attitude Can Improve Symptoms

Your psychological outlook is also important, with studies finding benefits from cognitive therapy for women with fibromyalgia. Specifically, studies find, negative thinking increases stress and affects your perception of pain, so learning to minimize and control these thoughts can improve your symptoms.

The key is not so much to "think positively," but to "think non-negatively." So when negative thoughts occur, ask yourself: "Does this thought benefit me in any way—does it improve the way I feel, advance my goals or improve a relationship?"

Strategies for dealing with negative thoughts include:

  • Alternative interpretation. You might start with a fairly neutral thought such as "I'm tired today." From there, it's easy to go negative—"I feel lousy. I won't get anything done today." An alternative, non-negative interpretation could be: "What strategies can I try to sleep better so I won't feel so tired?"

  • Anti-catastrophic reappraisal. This technique consists of challenging negative thoughts. You might have a catastrophic thought such as, "This fatigue is never going to get better. I'll never wake up with any energy." When you have such thoughts, ask yourself: How likely is it really that the fatigue will never get better? Have you ever been more fatigued than you are today?

  • Coping statements. In these statements, you tell yourself that you can handle these symptoms, and remind yourself of strategies you've used in the past to cope with or alleviate symptoms.

  • Label shifting. How we describe things influences our overall mood and physical sense of well being. So instead of viewing your pain as excruciating, try describing it as uncomfortable, or view it as a warning that maybe you've been overdoing it.

Medications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first medication for fibromyalgia in June 2007. Pregabalin (Lyrica) was already approved in the United States for the treatment of seizures, pain from shingles and diabetic neuropathy. Common side effects may include mild-to-moderate dizziness and sleepiness, and it could impair motor function and cause problems with concentration and driving.

Other medications that have good medical evidence to support their use in fibromyalgia but are not currently indicated for the treatment of fibromyalgia include the following:

  • Antidepressants, including the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (Elavil); the selective dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine (Cymbalta) and milnacipran (not currently available in the United States); and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine (Prozac) and paroxetine (Paxil).
  • Tramadol (Ultram), a centrally acting analgesic for pain relief, which may be taken with or without acetaminophen.
  • Muscle relaxant, cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) to improve sleep and reduce pain and muscle spasms.
  • Zolpidem (Ambien), a sleep aid that is sometimes prescribed for short intervals to those having severe sleep problems. It does not improve pain, however.
  • Anticonvulsant, gabapentin (Neurontin), which is similar to pregabalin (Lyrica).

Complementary Approaches

In addition to medication, a variety of alternative and lifestyle approaches can help you deal with symptoms of pain in general or pain caused by exercise. However, be aware that there is limited scientific evidence to support these approaches at this time.

  • Massage therapy can be very effective short-term. For the best results, look for a licensed massage therapist who has worked with fibromyalgia patients before.

  • Moist heat supplied by warm towels, hot packs, a hot bath or a shower can be used at home for 15 to 20 minutes three times a day to relieve symptoms.

  • Cold supplied by a bag of ice or frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel helps reduce pain when used for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Don't do this, however, if you have Raynaud's phenomenon.

  • Hydrotherapy (water therapy) can reduce pain during exercise and help you improve endurance and conditioning. Exercising in a large pool may be easier because water has buoying effect. Community centers, YMCAs and YWCAs have water exercise classes developed for people with arthritis and other conditions that may make exercise painful. To find a YMCA or YWCA in your area, check out www.ymca.net/find_your_ymca. Some patients also find relief from the heat and movement provided by a whirlpool.

  • Relaxation techniques help reduce pain and anxiety. These include meditation and guided imagery. Check with local recreation centers and hospitals for courses.

  • Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese treatment that is often used for pain relief. A qualified acupuncturist places very thin needles in certain parts of your body. Researchers believe that the needles stimulate deep sensory nerves that tell the brain to release natural painkillers (endorphins). However, the National Institutes of Health sponsored two recent studies of acupuncture in fibromyalgia that found acupuncture was no better than a placebo control condition in reducing pain. Acupressure is similar to acupuncture, but pressure is applied to the sites instead of needles.

  • Biofeedback is a form of therapy used to train your mind to understand and, to a degree, control your own physiological responses. An electronic device provides information about a body function (such as heart rate) so you learn to consciously control that function. For instance, it can help you learn to relax your muscles.

  • Hypnotherapy involves putting patients under hypnosis (a trance-like state of altered awareness and perception) to elicit a heightened responsiveness to suggestions.

For the rest of this article, questions to ask your health care professional, information on diagnosis, prevention and more, click here.

Author: Editorial Staff of the National Women's Health Resource Center