Preventing Whiplash Watertown NY

If you've ever been involved in an automobile accident, you more than likely know the feeling of waking up the next day with a nagging soreness in your neck.

Cheney Tire
(315) 788-6840
839 State Street%2C %23 5
Watertown, NY
Services
Lawn Mowers Retail, Auto Service & Repair, Auto Tire Shop Equipment & Supplies, Custom Car Parts & Accessories, Snow Removal Equipment
Hours
24 Hours Service
Payment Options
90 Days Same as Cash

Firestone Complete Auto Care Store
(315) 773-8025
Bldg 11110 Iraqi Freedom Dr
Fort Drum, NY
Hours
M-F: 7:00am-6:00pm
Sa: 7:00am-5:00pm

Advantage Auto Stores
(315) 782-8500
839 State
Watertown, NY
Services
Brake Repair

Andys Transmission
(315) 486-2442
521 Cayuga Ave
Watertown, NY
 
Northern Transmissions LLC
(315) 785-8321
1544 State St
Watertown, NY
 
Service Plus
27721 ROUTE 283
Calcium, NY
 
Tracy Automotive Repair
249 COFFEEN ST
Watertown, NY
 
Midas Auto Service Experts
(315) 788-0403
817 Arsenal St
Watertown, NY
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Car Washes, Car Detailing, Mufflers Repair

Pennzoil 10 Minute Oil Change
(315) 782-3129
1009 Arsenal St
Watertown, NY
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Oil Change and Lube

Watertown Auto Repair Service
26109 NYS RTE 283
Watertown, NY
 

Preventing Whiplash

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If you've ever been involved in an automobile accident, you more than likely know the feeling of waking up the next day with a nagging soreness in your neck.

That pain is known as whiplash, and is a common injury following an accident, especially a rear-end collision.

While it may be common, whiplash is an injury that can be far less severe (and sometimes prevented entirely) depending on the type of headrest in your vehicle and whether it is properly adjusted. Indeed, the term headrest is really quite misleading. Headrests are not designed for resting your head; its true purpose is to protect your head from moving too far backward in a rear-end collision. In other words, it's there to reduce whiplash. In fact, safety experts and automakers instead refer to them as head restraints.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS, www.iihs.org), one of two groups in the United States that provide consumers with crash test ratings, began studying the effectiveness of head restraints in 1995. At that time, only five models were designated "Good" (the Institute's highest of four scores) with regard to their head restraints. To determine the ratings, the Institute uses a static test that measures a crash test dummy's head position in relation to the head restraint; what the Institute refers to as head restraint "geometry." Since that time, head restraints have improved dramatically. For 2004 model-year vehicles, the IIHS reported that 80 percent of models had "Good" or "Acceptable" ratings for head restraints.

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