Restoring Mortar Joints in Historic Buildings Syracuse NY

In a properly designed and constructed masonry wall in Syracuse, mortar joints can last 50 years or more without maintenance. Eventually, though, natural weathering by wind and rain will cause the mortar to erode.

Hess Corporation
(315) 234-5330
100 Clinton Sq.
Syracuse, NY
 
Ryan Heneka's Decorative Concrete
(315) 506-0336
105 Melvin Avenue
Liverpool, NY
 
New Heritage Woodworking
(315) 677-3884
7022 Bush Road
Jamesville, NY
 
MJ Richardson Contracting
(315) 472-1085
123 Richards Rd
Camillus, NY
 
Brian King Contracting
(315) 263-3577
21 Lock St
Baldwinsville, NY
 
Capital Home Improvements
(315) 565-5401
914A Old Liverpool Road
Liverpool, NY
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roofing, masonry, chimney repair, windows, sunrooms

Energy Savers, Inc.
(315) 437-3008
203B Bagg St.
East Syracuse, NY
 
Expert Chimney Services, Inc
(315) 469-5004
4800 McDonald Rd
Syracuse, NY
 
Nu-Crete
(315) 720-6599
P.O. Box 145
Baldwinsville, NY
 
J.P. Megnin General Contracting
(315) 391-1383
938 Cty Rt 11
West Monroe, NY
 

Restoring Mortar Joints in Historic Buildings

Provided By:

Source: Masonry Construction
Publication date: October 1, 1993

By Kenneth A. Hooker

In a properly designed and constructed masonry wall, mortar joints can last 50 years or more without maintenance. Eventually, though, natural weathering by wind and rain will cause the mortar to erode. Masonry with seriously deteriorated mortar can be repaired by repointing; that is, removing the damaged mortar back to a uniform depth and refilling the joints with new material.WHEN TO REPOINTRepointing should be considered whenever existing mortar joints are eroded 1/3 inch or more from the face of the masonry, visibly cracked, or separated from the masonry units. It is seldom necessary to repoint all the joints in a building. To avoid needless effort and control costs, it's best to repoint only those areas where the mortar actually has deteriorated.MORTAR COMPOSITIONWhen repointing historic masonry, trying to match the original mortar is important. All mortars consist of water, aggregate, and a binder. The mason should match each of these as close as he can to the original mortar. Lime was the sole binder in most mortar produced before the introduction of portland cement in the 1870s. Repointing mortar for old masonry may use lime alone or lime combined with a small amount of white or gray portland cement to speed setting and improve durability. Aggregate makes up the largest portion of mortar and is the most important element in matching color and texture.

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