Securing AV Systems Long Island City NY

BEFORE THE digital age of AV, security for an AV system meant either adding a locked door for the whole system or physical security panels on individual pieces of equipment. Audio equipment, in particular, such as equalizers, compressors, and amplifiers needed protection against anonymous tweakers. Some of these panels even had keys of their own. But with today's AV systems, it's no longer that simple.

Magnolia Home Theater
(718) 626-7585
5001 NORTHERN BLVD
Long Island City, NY
 
Electronic Lifestyles
(212) 308-8069
4840 38th Street
Long Island City, NY
 
Audio Video Craft
(718) 706-8300
909 44th Ave
Long Island City, NY
 
Ultimate Sound & Installations
(718) 729-2111
36-16 29th Street
Long Island City, NY
 
Sound Response
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244 Madison Avenue, Suite 2J
New York, NY
 
Home Entertainment Design Inc.
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43-22 12Th Street Home Entertainment Design Inc.
Long Island City, NY
 
Audio Video Crafts
(718) 706-8300
9-09 44 Ave. Audio Video Crafts
Long Island Cit, NY
 
Audio Video Crafts, Inc. ~Founding Member~
(718) 706-8300
9-09 44th Avenue
Long Island City, NY
Services
Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Motorized Window Treatments / Home Theater Curtains

Ultimate Sound & Installations, Inc.
(718) 729-2111
36-16 29th Street
Long Island City, NY
Services
Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Motorized Window Treatments / Home Theater Curtains
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Calvin Smith, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Technetron Electronic Inc.
(212) 725-8778
36 East 29Th Street Technetron Electronic Inc.
New York, NY
 

Securing AV Systems

Provided By:

Source: PRO AV Magazine
Publication date: October 1, 2005

By Tim Cape, CTS-D

Before the digital age of AV, security for an AV system meant either adding a locked door for the whole system or physical security panels on individual pieces of equipment. Audio equipment, in particular, such as equalizers, compressors, and amplifiers needed protection against anonymous tweakers. Some of these panels even had keys of their own. But with today's AV systems, it's no longer that simple.

Before DSP and networking took hold in AV, there was digital control of analog devices, primarily using the big three control technologies: RS232, IR, and relays. Because the control signals only went from the control system processor to each device on dedicated wiring, and control system programming was a relatively rare and esoteric art, there wasn't much security required in these systems except for the same old audio device protections. Later, with the advent of analog devices with built-in digital control at the front panel, physical security panels became less necessary in some cases. The front panel could simply be locked out while the analog device behind it kept working.

Now we have other concerns. DSP has become mainstream — at least for audio systems. And Ethernet, both wired and wireless, is now mandatory for almost any pro AV system. Spread spectrum, Bluetooth, and other wireless technologies are also showing up. All of these options have added more flexibility in pro AV systen.

Click here to read full article from Pro AV Magazine