Snake Eyes Introduction Watertown NY

Fiber optic cable transmits light, but can it detect it, too? Yes, according to a group of researchers who have developed glass fibers that can measure the direction, intensity, and phase of light.

Drs Technologies Incorporated
(315) 773-6344
2070 Hanger Access Dr
Fort Drum, NY
 
Rex Tv & Appliances
(315) 788-1801
20839 State Route 3
Watertown, NY
 
Westelcom
(315) 755-2255
130 Park Pl
Watertown, NY
 
Spectrum Enterprise
(315) 788-7777
95 Public Sq
Watertown, NY
 
City Electric Co., Inc.
(315) 782-0704
23763 NYS Route 12%2C Bradley Street
Watertown, NY
Services
Contractors Tools & Fasteners, Electric Equipment & Supplies Dealers, Electric Equipment & Supplies Wholesale & Manufacturers, Consumer Electronics Stores, Electric Equipment & Supplies Job Lots
Hours
Mon 07: 30 AM-05: 00 PM
Tue 07: 30 AM-05: 00 PM
Wed 07: 30 AM-05: 00 PM


Raytheon
(315) 775-0541
4475 Camp Hale Rd
Fort Drum, NY
 
Junction Incorporated
(315) 788-1754
22040 Us Route 11
Watertown, NY
 
Radio Shack
(315) 788-0673
1125 Arsenal St
Watertown, NY
 
Dixons TV Sales & Svce
(315) 788-5398
515 E Main St
Watertown, NY
 
Jake's Tv
(315) 788-7869
25241 Perch Lake Rd
Watertown, NY
 

Snake Eyes Introduction

Provided By:

Source: PRO AV Magazine
Publication date: September 1, 2006

By Tim Kridel

Fiber optic cable transmits light, but can it detect it, too? Yes, according to a group of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who have developed glass fibers that can measure the direction, intensity, and phase of light. The technology eventually could be tweaked to detect sound, too.

Here's how it works: Each of the 1-millimeter photodetecting fibers looks like those found in standard fiber optic cables, except that it has a “gut” of metal electrodes and semiconductor material running the length of its inside. When light hits the glass surface, it produces an electrical signal that triggers the detection process. These electrical signals are then fed into a standard PC that processes that information to determine each light beam's direction. For example, the system could track the movement of a laser pointer as it moves across a projection screen embedded with fibers.

The fibers can detect light beams coming from any direction, so unlike conventional optical systems — such as camera arrays — they have a much larger field of view. However, a single fiber can't detect the light beam's angle of incidence. To overcome that limitation, the MIT researchers fashioned the fibers into a spherical array 30 centimeters in diameter.

Click here to read full article from Pro AV Magazine